Steroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazole

An increased frequency of cardiovascular defects and decreased body weight were observed among the offspring of pregnant rats treated with methylprednisolone in a dose that was similar to that used for oral therapy in humans but was toxic to the mothers. In contrast, no teratogenic effect was noted in rats with doses <1-18 times those typically used or oral therapy in humans in another study. High frequencies of foetal death and a variety of central nervous system and skeletal anomalies were reported in the offspring of pregnant rabbits treated with methylprednisolone in doses less than those used in humans. The relevance of these findings to the risk of malformations in human infants born to mothers treated with methylprednisolone in pregnancy is unknown. Safety margins for the reported teratogenic effects are unknown.

A wide range of psychiatric reactions include affective disorders (such as irritable, euphoric, depressed and labile moods psychological dependence and suicidal thoughts), psychotic reactions (including mania, delusions, hallucinations and aggravation of schizophrenia), behavioural disturbance , irritability, anxiety, sleep disturbances, cognitive dysfunction including confusion and amnesia have been reported for all corticosteroids. Reactions are common and may occur in both adults and children. In adults, the frequency of severe reactions was estimated to be a 5-6%. Psychological effects have been reported on withdrawal of corticosteroids; the frequency is unknown

Steroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazole

steroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazole

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steroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazolesteroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazolesteroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazolesteroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazolesteroid-induced mania treated with aripiprazole

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