Side effect of steroids prednisone

Prednisone is a drug that belongs to the corticosteroid drug class, and is an anti-inflammatory and immune system suppressant. It's used to treat a variety of diseases and conditions, for example: inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), lupus, asthma, cancers, and several types of arthritis.

Common side effects are weight gain, headache, fluid retention, and muscle weakness. Other effects and adverse events include glaucoma, cataracts, obesity, facial hair growth, moon face, and growth retardation in children. This medicine also causes psychiatric problems, for example: depression, insomnia, mood swings, personality changes, and psychotic behavior. Serious side effects include reactions to diabetes drugs, infections, and necrosis of the hips and joints.

Corticosteroids like prednisone, have many drug interactions; examples include: estrogens, phenytoin (Dilantin), diuretics, warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), and diabetes drugs. Prednisone is available as tablets of 1, , 10, 20, and 50 mg; extended release tablets of 1, 2, and 5mg; and oral solution of 5mg/5ml. It's use during the first trimester of pregnancy may cause cleft palate. This medicine is secreted in breast milk and can cause side effects in infants who are nursing. You should not stop taking prednisone abruptly because it can cause withdrawal symptoms and adrenal failure. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about beta-blockers. Talk with your doctor, pharmacist, or other medical professional if you have questions about prednisone.

If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist. In the US -Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. In Canada - Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

  1. Male patients with carcinoma of the breast , or with known or suspected carcinoma of the prostate .
  2. Carcinoma of the breast in females with hypercalcemia ; androgenic anabolic steroids may stimulate osteolytic resorption of bone .
  3. Nephrosis or the nephrotic phase of nephritis .
  4. WINSTROL (anabolic steroids) can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman.
WINSTROL (anabolic steroids) is contraindicated in women who are or may become pregnant. If this drug is used during pregnancy , or if the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, the patient should be apprised of the potential hazard to the fetus .

As for individual use of a personal nature, outside therapeutic treatment, this is where we will find the vast majority of anabolic steroids. It is here we will also find the biggest problems, not in terms of ill-effects of a physical or mental nature but of those surrounding legality. In places like the . anabolic steroids are controlled substances, and here we will find the strictest of laws. This has created a new class of criminal; most commonly an adult man with a family who is simply living an every day life like everyone else. These are issues that need to be discussed and you will find very few are willing to touch them unlike .

Topical and systemic steroids have proven to be invaluable agents in the treatment of a wide range of disorders, but their use is not without potential complications. Before initiation of therapy with systemic steroids, a personal or family history of cataracts, glaucoma, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, renal stones, peptic ulceration, and current infection or pregnancy should be ascertained, because these patients have an increased risk of complications. Prior to long-term therapy with systemic steroids, blood pressure measurement, tuberculin skin test, and anergy panel are recommended. Monthly follow-up may include measurements of weight, blood pressure, electrolytes, and blood sugar and guaiac testing of the stool. To prevent the ocular complications of steroid therapy, routine screening is indicated (Table 1). Screening for cataracts, which occur most commonly as a sequela of continuous systemic steroid use, may be performed by slit-lamp examinations conducted three or four times a year for patients on long-term therapy and twice a year for patients taking intermittent topical ocular or systemic steroids. Glaucoma is more often associated with topical ocular or periocular steroids than with systemic steroids; recommended screening includes a baseline intraocular pressure measurement, then routine pressure measurements taken every few weeks initially, then every few months. Ocular rebound inflammation may develop secondary to rapid tapering or abrupt discontinuation of topical ocular steroid use and is best prevented with gradual tapering. Opportunistic infections of the eye include bacterial, viral, and fungal infections and are most often associated with the use of topical ocular steroids. Ophthalmologic evaluation is indicated promptly if patients treated with ocular steroids develop ocular discharge, pain, photophobia, or redness.

Side effect of steroids prednisone

side effect of steroids prednisone

Topical and systemic steroids have proven to be invaluable agents in the treatment of a wide range of disorders, but their use is not without potential complications. Before initiation of therapy with systemic steroids, a personal or family history of cataracts, glaucoma, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, renal stones, peptic ulceration, and current infection or pregnancy should be ascertained, because these patients have an increased risk of complications. Prior to long-term therapy with systemic steroids, blood pressure measurement, tuberculin skin test, and anergy panel are recommended. Monthly follow-up may include measurements of weight, blood pressure, electrolytes, and blood sugar and guaiac testing of the stool. To prevent the ocular complications of steroid therapy, routine screening is indicated (Table 1). Screening for cataracts, which occur most commonly as a sequela of continuous systemic steroid use, may be performed by slit-lamp examinations conducted three or four times a year for patients on long-term therapy and twice a year for patients taking intermittent topical ocular or systemic steroids. Glaucoma is more often associated with topical ocular or periocular steroids than with systemic steroids; recommended screening includes a baseline intraocular pressure measurement, then routine pressure measurements taken every few weeks initially, then every few months. Ocular rebound inflammation may develop secondary to rapid tapering or abrupt discontinuation of topical ocular steroid use and is best prevented with gradual tapering. Opportunistic infections of the eye include bacterial, viral, and fungal infections and are most often associated with the use of topical ocular steroids. Ophthalmologic evaluation is indicated promptly if patients treated with ocular steroids develop ocular discharge, pain, photophobia, or redness.

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