Inhaled corticosteroids in severe copd

Long-acting bronchodilators in combination with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are recommended to decrease the risk of recurrent exacerbations in patients with Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage 3-4 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). There is increasing concern about the clinical benefit and long-term safety of ICS use in COPD patients. The WISDOM (Withdrawal of Inhaled Steroids During Optimised bronchodilator Management) study ( NCT00975195 ) aims to evaluate the need for ICS use via stepwise withdrawal of ICS in COPD patients (GOLD 3-4 with a history of at least one exacerbation during the 12-month period prior to screening) receiving dual bronchodilation. During the 6-week run-in period, 2456 patients receive tiotropium 18 μg once daily, salmeterol 50 μg twice daily and fluticasone 500 μg twice daily. In a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, active-controlled fashion, one group of patients continues to receive tiotropium, salmeterol and fluticasone, while the second group initiates stepwise withdrawal of fluticasone. The primary end point is time to first moderate or severe exacerbation following randomized treatment over 52 weeks. Lung function, symptoms and safety are also assessed. A sub-study aims to identify sub-populations and markers of steroid need. This study will determine the benefit of continued ICS therapy in combination with dual long-acting bronchodilators in COPD.

Patients requiring oral corticosteroids should be weaned slowly from systemic corticosteroid use after transferring to PULMICORT RESPULES (budesonide inhalation suspension) . Initially, PULMICORT RESPULES should be used concurrently with the patient's usual maintenance dose of systemic corticosteroid. After approximately one week, gradual withdrawal of the systemic corticosteroid may be initiated by reducing the daily or alternate daily dose. Further incremental reductions may be made after an interval of one or two weeks, depending on the response of the patient. Generally, these decrements should not exceed 25% of the prednisone dose or its equivalent. A slow rate of withdrawal is strongly recommended.

Stopping corticosteroid therapy
In autoimmune disease, clear end-points should be set before starting therapy. Corticosteroids may improve mood and give patients a feeling of general well-being unrelated to the effect on the disease being treated. Subjective assessments can therefore be misleading. Objective clinical parameters should be used to monitor the need for continuing or restarting therapy . proteinuria in nephritis, spirometry in asthma and creatinine kinase in myositis. Therapy should be tapered off. For example, with prednis(ol)one, the dose is reduced in steps of -5 mg every 3-7 days down to 15 mg/day. At that point, switch to alternate day therapy and reduce in mg steps over 2-3 weeks. This minimises the impact on mood and lessens the drop in general well-being.

Certain drugs such as troleandomycin (TAO), erythromycin ( Ery-Tab , EryPed 200), and clarithromycin ( Biaxin ) and ketoconazole ( Nizoral ) can reduce the ability of the liver to metabolize (breakdown) corticosteroids and this may lead to an increase in the levels and side effects of corticosteroids in the body. On the other hand, phenobarbital, ephedrine , phenytoin ( Dilantin ), and rifampin ( Rifadin , Rimactane ) may reduce the blood levels of corticosteroids by increasing the breakdown of corticosteroids by the liver. This may necessitate an increase of corticosteroid dose when they are used in combination with these drugs.

Inhaled corticosteroids in severe copd

inhaled corticosteroids in severe copd

Certain drugs such as troleandomycin (TAO), erythromycin ( Ery-Tab , EryPed 200), and clarithromycin ( Biaxin ) and ketoconazole ( Nizoral ) can reduce the ability of the liver to metabolize (breakdown) corticosteroids and this may lead to an increase in the levels and side effects of corticosteroids in the body. On the other hand, phenobarbital, ephedrine , phenytoin ( Dilantin ), and rifampin ( Rifadin , Rimactane ) may reduce the blood levels of corticosteroids by increasing the breakdown of corticosteroids by the liver. This may necessitate an increase of corticosteroid dose when they are used in combination with these drugs.

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